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    Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

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    FamousDavis
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    Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  FamousDavis on Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:30 pm

    I see this all the time on the course. A player hits his approach shot 10 feet short of the green, the pin is 50 feet away and he chooses a sand wedge or lob wedge to chip with. Almost every single time I see these people come up short of the flag. Once in awhile they'll skull one and it goes screaming past the pin.

    Why would anyone choose a high lofted wedge to chip with other than those times when the pin is cut tight and you're short sided? How can you possibly think that you can be as accurate with a club where you need to gauge height, distance and speed rather than simply tapping a 7 iron just beyond the fringe and letting it roll out?

    I will use a gap wedge all the way down to a 5 iron for chipping, depending on how far away I am from the flag. If I'm 10 feet off the green and the flag is 40 feet away, I'm confident that I'll get it within 5 feet of the flag with a 7 iron or 8 iron. With a sand wedge, I'd feel confident getting it to within 10 feet at best from that distance. A lob wedge? Why on earth would anyone use that to chip with?

    Again, I'm not talking about pitch shots, lob shots or shots where the pin is very close to the edge of the green at the same side as your ball. I'm talking chip shots where the ball can roll up to the flag.

    Another shot I use quite frequently is the hybrid club chip. I'll use my 18 degree. I do this when I'm in the fringe but a little too far off the green to use my putter. I can't tell you how many times I end up a foot away from the flag using a hybrid.

    I used to play with a guy who would flop all of his chip shots. Worst chipper I ever saw.
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    jt1135

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  jt1135 on Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:38 pm

    Generally use a gap wedge also for close up chips. To each his own I guess.
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    Mongrel

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Mongrel on Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:48 pm

    Its the curse of Dave Pelz, Phil Mickleson, Tiger Woods and all the other guys on Tour who have practiced thousands of hours hitting all kinds of chips and pitches with their lob wedges. And the suckers have taken the bait big time. Alas, I was one of the suckers but after playing weekly rounds lasst season and urinating strokes almost beyond count into the sewer system, I vowed to change to a much simpler technique that would allow me to use different clubs for different distances on chips and pitches. The technique I've adopted comes from a feature article in a Golf Magazine from 2011 entitled "How to Break 80." Although I'd read that article many times, one morning on the throne I revisted it and saw the technique explained with two short paragraphs and two small photographs and have been practicing it ever since both outside and on my basement carpet. I have a bunch of wedges lying around including a 60* Mizuno and a 64* Wilson. I will never bag either of them. I have a 58* Mizuno MP and the same model head in 54* that will go will some sort of gap wedge. Probably a Vokey 52*. In addition, I will also carry my Nickent 56*. So I will be in violation of the Loft Gap Rule as promulgated by almost every Expert and PGA Instructor who has written or will write articles about short games in the various golf magazines. I care not a whit.
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    Kiwigolfer

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Kiwigolfer on Mon Feb 04, 2013 2:51 pm

    FD this topic was comprehensively covered back at our old digs:

    http://forums.golfreview.com/showthread.php?p=107083

    Read this from start to finish for the definitive answer to your question and please refrain from dredging up old topics in future.

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    FamousDavis
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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  FamousDavis on Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:03 pm

    Kiwi,

    This is a different forum and I think we need to discuss it further. I know you like the other forum better, so you can listen to Larry talk about the swing for the millionth time and then have Alan criticize him shortly thereafter.

    I know you don't like my forum as much. It cuts me deep but now I see how you roll. Sigh.


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    Horseballs

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Horseballs on Mon Feb 04, 2013 3:20 pm

    As a general trend, I probably use too much loft. When I'm in the rough, I like to play the ball back in the stance and be more steep. I'm still hitting a low chip, just not with a shallow swing. Off a clean lie, there is no question that you should use less loft and make a more sweeping pass at the ball.
    Probably the best short game dude I know uses only a 60 around the greens. The guy can do anything with that club. Even the vaunted BnR60.

    Golfaholic

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Golfaholic on Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:11 pm

    I use my 60º because I'm good at the shot. Low Handicappers can hit shots like that.

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    Poe4soul

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Poe4soul on Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:33 pm

    I think it depends on how you learned the game. I grew up playing chip and putt games with my old man. It wasn't a bag of clubs. You brought a wedge and a putter to the practice green with one ball. We played up and down games. Because I only had one wedge I learned to use one wedge for different shots. I can hit low running chips or high dead chips with the my 58* wedge. One occasion I'll get smart and switch to my 52* when the greens are slow or wet. I've tried to use different clubs link a 7 iron but more often than not I hit the ball way too far and hard. Probably because I'm thinking it's a wedge in my hand... I also like the shorter club choked down better than a longer club not to mention that the sole grind of a wedge is made for the chip/sand shot with the correct bounce. A 8 iron doesn't have the required bounce.

    To each his own and there are successful golfers that apply both techniques. I guess I'm more like an artist with a wedge than a technician like you've described.
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    FamousDavis
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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  FamousDavis on Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:53 pm

    Poe4soul wrote:I think it depends on how you learned the game. I grew up playing chip and putt games with my old man. It wasn't a bag of clubs. You brought a wedge and a putter to the practice green with one ball. We played up and down games. Because I only had one wedge I learned to use one wedge for different shots. I can hit low running chips or high dead chips with the my 58* wedge. One occasion I'll get smart and switch to my 52* when the greens are slow or wet. I've tried to use different clubs link a 7 iron but more often than not I hit the ball way too far and hard. Probably because I'm thinking it's a wedge in my hand... I also like the shorter club choked down better than a longer club not to mention that the sole grind of a wedge is made for the chip/sand shot with the correct bounce. A 8 iron doesn't have the required bounce.

    To each his own and there are successful golfers that apply both techniques. I guess I'm more like an artist with a wedge than a technician like you've described.

    Why would you think you have a wedge in your hand when you're holding a 7 iron?

    It seems to me that if a person uses the same club for a bunch of different shots then they'd be considered very one-dimensional. The player that can use the most efficient club for the shot at hand is the most effective and creative.

    I'm not sure if 'artist' is the best choice of words. I don't see an artist using the same brush for an entire painting.

    It has nothing to do with "to each his own" as some of you say. There is a right way and a wrong way. If you are 8 feet off the green and have 60 feet to the pin, using a sand wedge gives you less chance to get it close. It's a simple matter of physics and probability, which I don't have the time or inclination to elaborate on at this juncture in our discussion.



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    Poe4soul

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Poe4soul on Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:36 pm

    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:I think it depends on how you learned the game. I grew up playing chip and putt games with my old man. It wasn't a bag of clubs. You brought a wedge and a putter to the practice green with one ball. We played up and down games. Because I only had one wedge I learned to use one wedge for different shots. I can hit low running chips or high dead chips with the my 58* wedge. One occasion I'll get smart and switch to my 52* when the greens are slow or wet. I've tried to use different clubs link a 7 iron but more often than not I hit the ball way too far and hard. Probably because I'm thinking it's a wedge in my hand... I also like the shorter club choked down better than a longer club not to mention that the sole grind of a wedge is made for the chip/sand shot with the correct bounce. A 8 iron doesn't have the required bounce.

    To each his own and there are successful golfers that apply both techniques. I guess I'm more like an artist with a wedge than a technician like you've described.

    Why would you think you have a wedge in your hand when you're holding a 7 iron?

    It seems to me that if a person uses the same club for a bunch of different shots then they'd be considered very one-dimensional. The player that can use the most efficient club for the shot at hand is the most effective and creative.

    I'm not sure if 'artist' is the best choice of words. I don't see an artist using the same brush for an entire painting.

    It has nothing to do with "to each his own" as some of you say. There is a right way and a wrong way. If you are 8 feet off the green and have 60 feet to the pin, using a sand wedge gives you less chance to get it close. It's a simple matter of physics and probability, which I don't have the time or inclination to elaborate on at this juncture in our discussion.




    You should tell the pro's this because most of them go to a wedge for that shot.

    All I know is that if I practice with one club all the time I have a better feel for that one club. Believe me, I've tried your method and I don't do as well. It's like putting. I chip the way that works best for me.

    BTW - I'm also very talented at throwing balls. I can do it underhand, overhand, side arm, backspin, side spin, over spin, and I can roll it. All with the same hand! The same way I chip with one club. It's the KISS method. You have come do a different conclusion of varying the loft to control trajectory. Well done! It's not the best way, unless you are a high capper with very little hand eye coordination... Next you'll be proclaiming the advantages of left hand low putting or the use of a long putter.
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    FamousDavis
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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  FamousDavis on Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:54 pm

    Poe4soul wrote:
    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:I think it depends on how you learned the game. I grew up playing chip and putt games with my old man. It wasn't a bag of clubs. You brought a wedge and a putter to the practice green with one ball. We played up and down games. Because I only had one wedge I learned to use one wedge for different shots. I can hit low running chips or high dead chips with the my 58* wedge. One occasion I'll get smart and switch to my 52* when the greens are slow or wet. I've tried to use different clubs link a 7 iron but more often than not I hit the ball way too far and hard. Probably because I'm thinking it's a wedge in my hand... I also like the shorter club choked down better than a longer club not to mention that the sole grind of a wedge is made for the chip/sand shot with the correct bounce. A 8 iron doesn't have the required bounce.

    To each his own and there are successful golfers that apply both techniques. I guess I'm more like an artist with a wedge than a technician like you've described.

    Why would you think you have a wedge in your hand when you're holding a 7 iron?

    It seems to me that if a person uses the same club for a bunch of different shots then they'd be considered very one-dimensional. The player that can use the most efficient club for the shot at hand is the most effective and creative.

    I'm not sure if 'artist' is the best choice of words. I don't see an artist using the same brush for an entire painting.

    It has nothing to do with "to each his own" as some of you say. There is a right way and a wrong way. If you are 8 feet off the green and have 60 feet to the pin, using a sand wedge gives you less chance to get it close. It's a simple matter of physics and probability, which I don't have the time or inclination to elaborate on at this juncture in our discussion.




    You should tell the pro's this because most of them go to a wedge for that shot.

    All I know is that if I practice with one club all the time I have a better feel for that one club. Believe me, I've tried your method and I don't do as well. It's like putting. I chip the way that works best for me.

    BTW - I'm also very talented at throwing balls. I can do it underhand, overhand, side arm, backspin, side spin, over spin, and I can roll it. All with the same hand! The same way I chip with one club. It's the KISS method. You have come do a different conclusion of varying the loft to control trajectory. Well done! It's not the best way, unless you are a high capper with very little hand eye coordination... Next you'll be proclaiming the advantages of left hand low putting or the use of a long putter.

    No, most pros do not use a sand wedge when they've got a full green to work with and are only a few feet off the green. The majority get the ball running on the green right away.

    I can't relate to your limitations but I certainly can sympathize.

    Your 'throwing the ball' analogy is a feeble attempt to make a point. You only have two hands to throw with and one is your dominant hand, which really only leaves you with one. With golf, you have a wide choice of clubs at your disposal and you should choose the one that is best fitted for the shot at hand.

    I wasn't anticipating a solid argument from you. I think you should have kept quiet on this one.
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    Poe4soul

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Poe4soul on Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:29 pm

    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:
    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:I think it depends on how you learned the game. I grew up playing chip and putt games with my old man. It wasn't a bag of clubs. You brought a wedge and a putter to the practice green with one ball. We played up and down games. Because I only had one wedge I learned to use one wedge for different shots. I can hit low running chips or high dead chips with the my 58* wedge. One occasion I'll get smart and switch to my 52* when the greens are slow or wet. I've tried to use different clubs link a 7 iron but more often than not I hit the ball way too far and hard. Probably because I'm thinking it's a wedge in my hand... I also like the shorter club choked down better than a longer club not to mention that the sole grind of a wedge is made for the chip/sand shot with the correct bounce. A 8 iron doesn't have the required bounce.

    To each his own and there are successful golfers that apply both techniques. I guess I'm more like an artist with a wedge than a technician like you've described.

    Why would you think you have a wedge in your hand when you're holding a 7 iron?

    It seems to me that if a person uses the same club for a bunch of different shots then they'd be considered very one-dimensional. The player that can use the most efficient club for the shot at hand is the most effective and creative.

    I'm not sure if 'artist' is the best choice of words. I don't see an artist using the same brush for an entire painting.

    It has nothing to do with "to each his own" as some of you say. There is a right way and a wrong way. If you are 8 feet off the green and have 60 feet to the pin, using a sand wedge gives you less chance to get it close. It's a simple matter of physics and probability, which I don't have the time or inclination to elaborate on at this juncture in our discussion.




    You should tell the pro's this because most of them go to a wedge for that shot.

    All I know is that if I practice with one club all the time I have a better feel for that one club. Believe me, I've tried your method and I don't do as well. It's like putting. I chip the way that works best for me.

    BTW - I'm also very talented at throwing balls. I can do it underhand, overhand, side arm, backspin, side spin, over spin, and I can roll it. All with the same hand! The same way I chip with one club. It's the KISS method. You have come do a different conclusion of varying the loft to control trajectory. Well done! It's not the best way, unless you are a high capper with very little hand eye coordination... Next you'll be proclaiming the advantages of left hand low putting or the use of a long putter.

    No, most pros do not use a sand wedge when they've got a full green to work with and are only a few feet off the green. The majority get the ball running on the green right away.

    I can't relate to your limitations but I certainly can sympathize.

    Your 'throwing the ball' analogy is a feeble attempt to make a point. You only have two hands to throw with and one is your dominant hand, which really only leaves you with one. With golf, you have a wide choice of clubs at your disposal and you should choose the one that is best fitted for the shot at hand.

    I wasn't anticipating a solid argument from you. I think you should have kept quiet on this one.

    I guess Harvey Penick was all wrong when he had his students master 90% of their short shots using one club. Your approach is more aligned with pelze. dummy

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    FamousDavis
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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  FamousDavis on Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:46 pm

    Poe4soul wrote:
    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:
    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:I think it depends on how you learned the game. I grew up playing chip and putt games with my old man. It wasn't a bag of clubs. You brought a wedge and a putter to the practice green with one ball. We played up and down games. Because I only had one wedge I learned to use one wedge for different shots. I can hit low running chips or high dead chips with the my 58* wedge. One occasion I'll get smart and switch to my 52* when the greens are slow or wet. I've tried to use different clubs link a 7 iron but more often than not I hit the ball way too far and hard. Probably because I'm thinking it's a wedge in my hand... I also like the shorter club choked down better than a longer club not to mention that the sole grind of a wedge is made for the chip/sand shot with the correct bounce. A 8 iron doesn't have the required bounce.

    To each his own and there are successful golfers that apply both techniques. I guess I'm more like an artist with a wedge than a technician like you've described.

    Why would you think you have a wedge in your hand when you're holding a 7 iron?

    It seems to me that if a person uses the same club for a bunch of different shots then they'd be considered very one-dimensional. The player that can use the most efficient club for the shot at hand is the most effective and creative.

    I'm not sure if 'artist' is the best choice of words. I don't see an artist using the same brush for an entire painting.

    It has nothing to do with "to each his own" as some of you say. There is a right way and a wrong way. If you are 8 feet off the green and have 60 feet to the pin, using a sand wedge gives you less chance to get it close. It's a simple matter of physics and probability, which I don't have the time or inclination to elaborate on at this juncture in our discussion.




    You should tell the pro's this because most of them go to a wedge for that shot.

    All I know is that if I practice with one club all the time I have a better feel for that one club. Believe me, I've tried your method and I don't do as well. It's like putting. I chip the way that works best for me.

    BTW - I'm also very talented at throwing balls. I can do it underhand, overhand, side arm, backspin, side spin, over spin, and I can roll it. All with the same hand! The same way I chip with one club. It's the KISS method. You have come do a different conclusion of varying the loft to control trajectory. Well done! It's not the best way, unless you are a high capper with very little hand eye coordination... Next you'll be proclaiming the advantages of left hand low putting or the use of a long putter.

    No, most pros do not use a sand wedge when they've got a full green to work with and are only a few feet off the green. The majority get the ball running on the green right away.

    I can't relate to your limitations but I certainly can sympathize.

    Your 'throwing the ball' analogy is a feeble attempt to make a point. You only have two hands to throw with and one is your dominant hand, which really only leaves you with one. With golf, you have a wide choice of clubs at your disposal and you should choose the one that is best fitted for the shot at hand.

    I wasn't anticipating a solid argument from you. I think you should have kept quiet on this one.

    I guess Harvey Penick was all wrong when he had his students master 90% of their short shots using one club. Your approach is more aligned with pelze. dummy


    You spelled Pelz wrong.
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    Poe4soul

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Poe4soul on Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:51 pm

    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:
    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:
    FamousDavis wrote:
    Poe4soul wrote:I think it depends on how you learned the game. I grew up playing chip and putt games with my old man. It wasn't a bag of clubs. You brought a wedge and a putter to the practice green with one ball. We played up and down games. Because I only had one wedge I learned to use one wedge for different shots. I can hit low running chips or high dead chips with the my 58* wedge. One occasion I'll get smart and switch to my 52* when the greens are slow or wet. I've tried to use different clubs link a 7 iron but more often than not I hit the ball way too far and hard. Probably because I'm thinking it's a wedge in my hand... I also like the shorter club choked down better than a longer club not to mention that the sole grind of a wedge is made for the chip/sand shot with the correct bounce. A 8 iron doesn't have the required bounce.

    To each his own and there are successful golfers that apply both techniques. I guess I'm more like an artist with a wedge than a technician like you've described.

    Why would you think you have a wedge in your hand when you're holding a 7 iron?

    It seems to me that if a person uses the same club for a bunch of different shots then they'd be considered very one-dimensional. The player that can use the most efficient club for the shot at hand is the most effective and creative.

    I'm not sure if 'artist' is the best choice of words. I don't see an artist using the same brush for an entire painting.

    It has nothing to do with "to each his own" as some of you say. There is a right way and a wrong way. If you are 8 feet off the green and have 60 feet to the pin, using a sand wedge gives you less chance to get it close. It's a simple matter of physics and probability, which I don't have the time or inclination to elaborate on at this juncture in our discussion.




    You should tell the pro's this because most of them go to a wedge for that shot.

    All I know is that if I practice with one club all the time I have a better feel for that one club. Believe me, I've tried your method and I don't do as well. It's like putting. I chip the way that works best for me.

    BTW - I'm also very talented at throwing balls. I can do it underhand, overhand, side arm, backspin, side spin, over spin, and I can roll it. All with the same hand! The same way I chip with one club. It's the KISS method. You have come do a different conclusion of varying the loft to control trajectory. Well done! It's not the best way, unless you are a high capper with very little hand eye coordination... Next you'll be proclaiming the advantages of left hand low putting or the use of a long putter.

    No, most pros do not use a sand wedge when they've got a full green to work with and are only a few feet off the green. The majority get the ball running on the green right away.

    I can't relate to your limitations but I certainly can sympathize.

    Your 'throwing the ball' analogy is a feeble attempt to make a point. You only have two hands to throw with and one is your dominant hand, which really only leaves you with one. With golf, you have a wide choice of clubs at your disposal and you should choose the one that is best fitted for the shot at hand.

    I wasn't anticipating a solid argument from you. I think you should have kept quiet on this one.

    I guess Harvey Penick was all wrong when he had his students master 90% of their short shots using one club. Your approach is more aligned with pelze. dummy


    You spelled Pelz wrong.

    And you knew it. What does that say? How did I do with Penick?
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    12pierogi

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  12pierogi on Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:08 pm

    I would try and use one wedge for the majority of chipping around the greens. A pw or gw for quite a few years with mixed results.
    A few years ago I tried using varying clubs for the distance, and green I had to work with. Longer chips with plenty of green get the 8 iron, and so on down to a gw, once in awhile a sw. I see quite a few using a lob wedge, flying it the hole. Very few can do it with consistency.
    I would think if you could learn to vary the loft of the wedge in your hands you could accomplish the same thing with a 56, 58, 60 or one club, and a lot of practice.
    The beauty of using different lofts for varying distance, I would think is using a repeating stroke, or a similar chip for each and every club, and knowing the distance of each club in your hand. The net end result is I don't have to practice as much chipping, I just need to focus on the speed of the greens, instead of practicing different speed chips for varying distance. Keepin it simple
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    Kiwigolfer

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Kiwigolfer on Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:15 pm

    I'm sorry FD I keep forgetting that the threads that were the founding documents of GR lore are no longer relevant here. I think we need a few new ones. A matchplay strategies thread is currently a glaring omission.

    Back on topic I am probably similar to what HB described. I probably use my 52° gap wedge more often then I should. For longer chips with more roll I do use the PW & 9 iron quite often too but I don't usually use anything more than say an 8 iron for these types of shots. Once I get a longer club like a 7-6 iron I can't judge the distance very well plus I tend to chip with a delofted descending blow so a 6 iron barely carries even a few feet of fringe/rough. I'm just more comfortable with a more lofted club like a 9 iron.
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    12pierogi

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  12pierogi on Mon Feb 04, 2013 8:30 pm

    I may put this back in the bag, as I've never seen this heavy a loft keep the ball so low. Which may work somewhat better with the one wedge for chipping scenario. The shaft is like rebar, and its a tour van piece with the wrx treatment. With practice I could see it working.

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    Fluffy

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Fluffy on Tue Feb 05, 2013 3:57 am

    Alot is to do with course consistency.... If the greens are build different and are running at different speeds I trust a high lofted 56degree over a bump and run every day....If its consistent and the ball reacts the same I would also do a bit more bump and running towards the pin...

    I know a guy who's 0-150meter club is his 60 wedge.....Think he is around 5 handicap....He doesnt hit a driver far but the lob wedge at 150m is scary. he just has a horrible closed stance with closed clubface hitting inside out on all his shots.
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    Pky6471

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Pky6471 on Tue Feb 05, 2013 6:54 am

    I hit my chip shot using my 50* GW , when I am on a short grass next to the green, my 8i is deadly with a putting stroke Razz
    I use my 60* wedge for 50-55 yds out or when I am in front of a green-side bunker
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    Mongrel

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Mongrel on Tue Feb 05, 2013 9:27 am

    12pierogi wrote:I may put this back in the bag, as I've never seen this heavy a loft keep the ball so low. Which may work somewhat better with the one wedge for chipping scenario. The shaft is like rebar, and its a tour van piece with the wrx treatment. With practice I could see it working.


    I have the same MP Series 58/10 except in chrome finish with the typical DG wedge flex shaft. I'm not a big fan of the sole grind off tight lies or in hard-packed sand but the club is aces out of rough and for some reason, out of fairway bunkers from 30-70 yards. I picked up its sister 54/9 right before Christmas with the factory Accel-Arc graphite shaft and it is a wonderful trickster for long chips and intermediate pitches.
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    12pierogi

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  12pierogi on Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:38 am

    Mostly German wrote:
    12pierogi wrote:I may put this back in the bag, as I've never seen this heavy a loft keep the ball so low. Which may work somewhat better with the one wedge for chipping scenario. The shaft is like rebar, and its a tour van piece with the wrx treatment. With practice I could see it working.


    I have the same MP Series 58/10 except in chrome finish with the typical DG wedge flex shaft. I'm not a big fan of the sole grind off tight lies or in hard-packed sand but the club is aces out of rough and for some reason, out of fairway bunkers from 30-70 yards. I picked up its sister 54/9 right before Christmas with the factory Accel-Arc graphite shaft and it is a wonderful trickster for long chips and intermediate pitches.

    This one has been on a grinder. The leading edge is almost knife sharp, unlike its brother a 56-10 with a radius, or the one I bag a 53-8. These wrx wedges are mind of trick. They also milled the face, and recut the grooves, and they reshaft them with rebar.
    It's meant for around the greens, chipping, flopping super low balls.
    I think I'll bag it again this year, for me it's a 50 yard and in club.


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    FamousDavis
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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  FamousDavis on Tue Feb 05, 2013 12:59 pm

    Let's face it, the biggest obstacle we humans face is getting in our own way. This is especially true in golf. I've played golf now for over 30 years (I started very young) and I can honestly say that the biggest mental handicap I've seen is when a golfer thinks he's unique. We do this in all aspects of our lives but it really becomes obvious in golf.

    How often have you overheard a hacker at the range say "that doesn't work for me" or "I hold it like this because then I can do this..."

    When it comes to golf, we may be built differently and some may be stronger than others. However, when it comes to certain concepts like grip, weight shift, plane, etc. we're all pretty much in the same boat, meaning that we'd all play better if we adapted the basic fundamentals that make up a good golf swing.

    And so it is true with the short game. A person who thinks they are special and can chip best with a lob wedge is nothing short of an idiot in denial. The laws of probability, gravity, loft, spin, angle of attack, etc. all come into play for this person, just like they do for everyone else.

    If I'm 6 feet off the green and have a 50 foot chip (not that long, less than 20 yards)and I choose to use a sand wedge then I am openly admitting that I'm not an educated golfer. I must be honest and admit that my probability of success is diminished and that I am relying more on feel, touch and a solid hit than if I were using an 8 iron.

    It's OK to play dumb golf but it's not OK to play dumb golf without knowing it.
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    Mongrel

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Mongrel on Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:30 pm

    That hypothetical prototypical shot from six feet off the green to a hole 50 feet away has too many variables for one to proclaim with any certainty how the shot should be hit and with what club. Is it downhill, uphill, level, a combo of uphill, downhill, level or what? Does it break? Is the green fast or slow or grainy and if so, are you into or with the grain? What's between the ball and the green? Closely mown collar that you can putt over or bumpy or thick rough that you have to carry?

    If this shot is fairly level with closely-mown collar or fairway, I would probably putt the shot more than 50% of the time. If there is rough or bumpy turf making a putt a low probability choice, I will use anything from a 7 or 8 if the hole is up a severe slope to my highest lofted wedge played towards my back foot dead-handed if it severely downhill. Every shot's unique and the more shots you have in your arsenal, the better you will be. In my experience, the lowest probability shot is a high flop with a lob wedge with little bounce. It looks impressive but unless you practice it for thousands of hours like Phil the Lefty, you ain't got much chance. Besides, if you need to hit a high flop from 10 feet off the green to a hole cut close, you've screwed up your approach anyway so next time maybe play away from the inevitable short-side. Mongrel out.
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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  FamousDavis on Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:39 pm

    For simplicity sake, let's say the ball is 6 feet off the green, on fairway height grass (short) but a little too gnarly to putt through with any consistency. No big hills to go up or down and no big breaks. Just your standard slightly uphill shot from just off the green.

    Make sure you're no confusing this with a pitch shot. We're not talking pitch shots here. A pitch shot would be anything more than 8 to 10 feet from the green. We're talking just off the green.
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    Mongrel

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    Re: Why do people chip with high-lofted wedges?

    Post  Mongrel on Tue Feb 05, 2013 1:49 pm

    FamousDavis wrote:For simplicity sake, let's say the ball is 6 feet off the green, on fairway height grass (short) but a little too gnarly to putt through with any consistency. No big hills to go up or down and no big breaks. Just your standard slightly uphill shot from just off the green.

    Make sure you're no confusing this with a pitch shot. We're not talking pitch shots here. A pitch shot would be anything more than 8 to 10 feet from the green. We're talking just off the green.

    OK. Slightly uphill on a green rolling at medium speed I would probably hit my 52* Vokey with a little hook action after impact trying to land it about 20 feet away and roll it up to the hole. Or maybe my 58* off my back foot with the face held open landing it halfway there. I have practice both those type shots for hours and have them pretty much dialed in although I could also do PW or 9 iron chips landing about a third of the way and rolling out. If I had but one choice and had to hole it out, it would be the Vokey 52.

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